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Faranak Hardcastle

Dr Faranak Hardcastle

Faranak is a Research Fellow in the CELS-Oxford research group at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics and an Honorary Research Associate at the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies at the University Bristol. 

 

I am a sociotechnical researcher exploring how technologies and societies co-produce each other and evolve together. In my research I use insights from Web Science, Science and Technology Studies (STS), and Critical Data and Algorithm Studies to engage with the development and application of new technologies such as healthcare and web technologies. I am particularly interested in researching the sociotechnical relations that shape Big Data technologies, their application to Personalised Medicine, and their implications for knowledge making, ethics, and the lived experiences of different social groups. 

 

Digital and Health inequalities are key themes in my research. I often collaborate with experts from various disciplines and applies a range of qualitative and computational approaches. My current research explores the development and application of technologies of Personalised Medicine and their implications for researching health inequalities. This involves exploring how different conceptualisations of diversity, inclusion, generalisability, representativeness, and bias can affect approaches to developing AI/Machine learning techniques and the application of them to genomic medicine. This unpacking enables investigating what opportunities and challenges these approaches might bring for researching health inequalities. 

 

I am also interested in new creative and participatory methodologies. I am involved in a project that explores the application of story completion methods to engage with the views of people in Southampton about the use of routinely collected healthcare data. Prior to joining CELS I contributed to the S3W project, an interdisciplinary investigation of the opportunities and challenges of Semantic Linked Data for researching health inequalities that used the data from English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and the Great British Class Survey. My PhD research experimented with the application of speculative design for exploring the sociotechnical processes involved in Online Behavioural Tracking and Advertising technologies and practises.