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Our supervisors undertake research across 7 core themes:

1. GENOMIC AND -OMIC TECHNOLOGIES

Rachael Bashford-Rogers

We aim to determine the development, regulation and function of B and T cell populations in health and immunological diseases to lead us to an understanding of why certain individuals are at greater risk of developing immunological disease, as well as to identify potential therapeutic targets or improve clinical management. 

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Zameel Cader

Translation neuroscience using human stem cell models of the brain and advanced informatics.

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Sally Cowley

We use human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to model disease, focussing on innate immunity and neuroinflammation, with opportunities to undertake CRISPR/Cas-mediated mutagenesis and screens to uncover disease-associated pathways.   

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Ben Davies

Our group researches the utility of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing techniques to facilitate the generation of model systems, allowing the functional consequences of genome variation and mutation to be explored.

 

Robbie Davies

 

James Davies

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Daniel Ebner

 

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Deborah Gill

We use viral vectors, which target the lung and liver, to deliver genes and gene editing molecules for treatment of rare diseases. 

 

Chris Holmes

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Jim Hughes

The Hughes group combines molecular, computational and machine learning based approaches to investigate mammalian gene regulation and  the role sequence variation plays in common human disease. 

 

Valentina Iotchkova

 

Luke Jostins-Dean

 

Benedikt Kessler

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James McCullagh

Our group focuses on how chemical relationships between biomolecules are linked to their function in complex biological systems with particular focus on metabolism and its perturbations in health and disease. 

 

Stephen Sansom

 

2. FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS

 

Ben Davies

Our group researches the utility of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing techniques to facilitate the generation of model systems, allowing the functional consequences of genome variation and mutation to be explored.

 

James Davies

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Calli Dendrou

Our research aims to determine (i) how pleiotropic genetic variation affects immune responses in health and disease and (ii) how immune cell composition and function can be resolved at the single-cell level in primary human tissues to help inform therapeutic strategies. 

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Doug Higgs

We use state of the art technologies in molecular biology, imaging and computational analysis to establish the principles by which mammalian genes are switched on and off during lineage specification, differentiation and maturation. 

 

Jim Hughes

The Hughes group combines molecular, computational and machine learning based approaches to investigate mammalian gene regulation and  the role sequence variation plays in common human disease. 

 

Valentina Iotchkova

Julian Knight

Our group is interested in using multi-omic approaches to understand variation in the immune response to infection and autoimmunity with the goal of advancing personalised medicine and development of new drugs

Cecilia Lindgren

The multi-disciplinary Lindgren group apply a wide range of genetics and genomics methods to dissect the causes and consequences of obesity traits as well as related reproductive conditions.

 

Thomas Milne

 

Stephen Sansom

 

Tatjana Sauka-Spengler

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John Todd

The JDRF/Wellcome Trust DIL is researching the causes of the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes (T1D) in order to treat and prevent the disease by modulating the causative pathways.  

 

Irina Udalova

 

Nicola Whiffin

 

3. GENOME BIOLOGY

 

Sally Cowley

We use human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to model disease, focussing on innate immunity and neuroinflammation, with opportunities to undertake CRISPR/Cas-mediated mutagenesis and screens to uncover disease-associated pathways.   

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Cath Green

Our group studies somatic genome instability and the causes and consequences of mutation and genomic change.

 

Doug Higgs

We use state of the art technologies in molecular biology, imaging and computational analysis to establish the principles by which mammalian genes are switched on and off during lineage specification, differentiation and maturation.

 

Adrian Hill

Greger Larson

We extract, amplify, and analyse ancient DNA derived from archaeological and palaentological specimens to directly assess the evolution of animals and pathogens through time and space.

Pier Palamara

Our group develops new statistical and machine learning methods to enable novel analyses in population and disease genetics, with a particular interest in problems that involve large genomic datasets. 

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Adrian Smith

Our lab has a main focus on molecular immunology and infectious disease particularly from a comparative perspective including modern and ancient (archaeological) datasets.

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Daniel Wilson

We research the population genomics of pathogenic bacteria, including genome-wide association studies and evolutionary approaches.

 

4. GENOMICS OF DISEASE

 

Rachael Bashford-Rogers

We aim to determine the development, regulation and function of B and T cell populations in health and immunological diseases to lead us to an understanding of why certain individuals are at greater risk of developing immunological disease, as well as to identify potential therapeutic targets or improve clinical management. 

Shoumo Bhattacharya

Our goals are to develop therapeutics targeting the chemokine network in inflammatory diseases affecting the heart, blood vessels and other organ systems.”

 

Edward Blair

 

Zameel Cader

Translation neuroscience using human stem cell models of the brain and advanced informatics.

 

Barbara Casadei

 

Keith Channon

 

David Church

 

Calli Dendrou

Our research aims to determine (i) how pleiotropic genetic variation affects immune responses in health and disease and (ii) how immune cell composition and function can be resolved at the single-cell level in primary human tissues to help inform therapeutic strategies. 

 

Benjamin Fairfax

Christophe Fraser

We develop high-throughput pathogen genomics, computational analysis and modelling to improve infectious disease prevention, with particular but not exclusive focus on HIV/AIDS.

 

Adrian Hill

 

Luke Jostins-Dean

 

Julian Knight

Our group is interested in using multi-omic approaches to understand variation in the immune response to infection and autoimmunity with the goal of advancing personalised medicine and development of new drugs

Augustine Kong

We are interested in the effects of genetic nurturing, i.e. the genes in a person's relatives (e.g. parents and siblings) influencing their behaviour and social economic status and through that impact the outcomes of the person.

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Simon Leedham

Our work centres on the morphogenic control of intestinal stem cell fate in health, regeneration and cancer and the preclinical application of novel therapies to manipulate this regulation.

 

Cecilia Lindgren

The multi-disciplinary Lindgren group apply a wide range of genetics and genomics methods to dissect the causes and consequences of obesity traits as well as related reproductive conditions.

Katrina Lythgoe

We use a combination of mathematical modelling and the analysis of viral sequence data to better understand how within-host evolution affects how pathogens spread and evolve at the host population level.

 

Alex Mentzer

 

Thomas Milne

 

Andrea Németh

 

Jenny Taylor

The BRC Genomic Medicine Theme’s research currently focuses on the application of targeted and whole genome sequencing (WGS) to the diagnosis of rare diseases and cancer, and investigation of novel genes emerging applying a range of functional approaches.

 

John Todd

The JDRF/Wellcome Trust DIL is researching the causes of the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes (T1D) in order to treat and prevent the disease by modulating the causative pathways.  

 

Ellie Tzima

 

Hugh Watkins

Krina Zondervan

Our group works on understanding the pathogenesis of common women's health disorders through genomic, molecular, and environmental epidemiological research methods.  

 

5. GENOMIC ANALYSIS

 

Rachael Bashford-Rogers

We aim to determine the development, regulation and function of B and T cell populations in health and immunological diseases to lead us to an understanding of why certain individuals are at greater risk of developing immunological disease, as well as to identify potential therapeutic targets or improve clinical management. 

 

Robbie Davies

 

Benjamin Fairfax

 

Christophe Fraser

We develop high-throughput pathogen genomics, computational analysis and modelling to improve infectious disease prevention, with particular but not exclusive focus on HIV/AIDS.

 

Anne Goriely

 

Cath Green

Our group studies somatic genome instability and the causes and consequences of mutation and genomic change.

 

Chris Holmes

 

Valentina Iotchkova

 

Luke Jostins-Dean

 

Julian Knight

Our group is interested in using multi-omic approaches to understand variation in the immune response to infection and autoimmunity with the goal of advancing personalised medicine and development of new drugs

 

Augustine Kong

We are interested in the effects of genetic nurturing, i.e. the genes in a person's relatives (e.g. parents and siblings) influencing their behaviour and social economic status and through that impact the outcomes of the person.

 

Greger Larson

We extract, amplify, and analyse ancient DNA derived from archaeological and palaentological specimens to directly assess the evolution of animals and pathogens through time and space.

 

Cecilia Lindgren

The multi-disciplinary Lindgren group apply a wide range of genetics and genomics methods to dissect the causes and consequences of obesity traits as well as related reproductive conditions.

 

Alex Mentzer

 

Simon Myers

 

Pier Palamara

Our group develops new statistical and machine learning methods to enable novel analyses in population and disease genetics, with a particular interest in problems that involve large genomic datasets. 

 

Stephen Sansom

 

Tatjana Sauka-Spengler

 

Adrian Smith

Our lab has a main focus on molecular immunology and infectious disease particularly from a comparative perspective including modern and ancient (archaeological) datasets.

 

Jenny Taylor

The BRC Genomic Medicine Theme’s research currently focuses on the application of targeted and whole genome sequencing (WGS) to the diagnosis of rare diseases and cancer, and investigation of novel genes emerging applying a range of functional approaches.

 

Nicola Whiffin

 

6. FROM GENES TO CLINICAL PROOF OF CONCEPT

 

Rachael Bashford-Rogers

We aim to determine the development, regulation and function of B and T cell populations in health and immunological diseases to lead us to an understanding of why certain individuals are at greater risk of developing immunological disease, as well as to identify potential therapeutic targets or improve clinical management. 

 

Shoumo Bhattacharya

Our goals are to develop therapeutics targeting the chemokine network in inflammatory diseases affecting the heart, blood vessels and other organ systems.”

 

Edward Blair

 

Paul Brennan

 

Zameel Cader

Translation neuroscience using human stem cell models of the brain and advanced informatics.

 

Keith Channon

 

Ben Davies

Our group researches the utility of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing techniques to facilitate the generation of model systems, allowing the functional consequences of genome variation and mutation to be explored.

 

Calli Dendrou

Our research aims to determine (i) how pleiotropic genetic variation affects immune responses in health and disease and (ii) how immune cell composition and function can be resolved at the single-cell level in primary human tissues to help inform therapeutic strategies. 

 

Deborah Gill

We use viral vectors, which target the lung and liver, to deliver genes and gene editing molecules for treatment of rare diseases. 

 

James McCullagh

Our group focuses on how chemical relationships between biomolecules are linked to their function in complex biological systems with particular focus on metabolism and its perturbations in health and disease

 

Andrea Németh

 

Hugh Watkins

 

7. APPLICATION OF GENOMICS IN THE CLINIC

 

Shoumo Bhattacharya

Our goals are to develop therapeutics targeting the chemokine network in inflammatory diseases affecting the heart, blood vessels and other organ systems.”

 

Edward Blair

 

Keith Channon

 

David Church

 

Robbie Davies

 

James Davies

 

Benjamin Fairfax

 

Deborah Gill

We use viral vectors, which target the lung and liver, to deliver genes and gene editing molecules for treatment of rare diseases. 

 

Anne Goriely

 

Julian Knight

Our group is interested in using multi-omic approaches to understand variation in the immune response to infection and autoimmunity with the goal of advancing personalised medicine and development of new drugs

 

Simon Leedham

Our work centres on the morphogenic control of intestinal stem cell fate in health, regeneration and cancer and the preclinical application of novel therapies to manipulate this regulation.

 

Alex Mentzer

 

Andrea Németh

 

Jenny Taylor

The BRC Genomic Medicine Theme’s research currently focuses on the application of targeted and whole genome sequencing (WGS) to the diagnosis of rare diseases and cancer, and investigation of novel genes emerging applying a range of functional approaches.

 

Hugh Watkins

 

Nicola Whiffin

 Prospective students can contact our supervisors directly to ask about specific projects of interest.