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MicroRNAs are one class of small, endogenous, non-coding RNAs that are approximately 22 nucleotides in length; they are very numerous, have been phylogenetically conserved, and involved in biological processes such as development, differentiation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. MicroRNAs contribute to modulating the expression levels of specific proteins based on sequence complementarity with their target mRNA molecules and so they play a key role in both health and disease. Angiogenesis is the process of new blood vessel formation from preexisting ones, which is particularly relevant to cancer and its progression. Over the last few years, microRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of signalling pathways in multiple cell types including endothelial and perivascular cells. This review summarises the role of miRNAs in tumour angiogenesis and their potential implications as therapeutic targets in cancer.

Original publication

DOI

10.1155/2014/878450

Type

Journal article

Journal

BioMed research international

Publication Date

01/2014

Volume

2014

Addresses

Molecular Oncology Laboratory, General University Hospital Research Fundation, Avda Tres Cruces 2, 46014 Valencia, Spain.

Keywords

Animals, Humans, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Angiogenesis Inhibitors, MicroRNAs, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Precision Medicine