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The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key interface between the cerebrovasculature and adjacent brain tissues. Deregulation of the ECM contributes to a broad range of neurological disorders. However, despite this importance, our understanding of the ECM composition remains very limited mainly due to difficulties in its isolation. To address this, we developed an approach to extract the cerebrovascular ECM from mouse and human post-mortem normal brain tissues. We then used mass spectrometry with off-line high-pH reversed-phase fractionation to increase the protein detection. This identified more than 1000 proteins in the ECM-enriched fraction, with > 66% of the proteins being common between the species. We report 147 core ECM proteins of the human brain vascular matrisome, including collagens, laminins, fibronectin and nidogens. We next used network analysis to identify the connection between the brain ECM proteins and cerebrovascular diseases. We found that genes related to cerebrovascular diseases, such as COL4A1, COL4A2, VCAN and APOE were significantly enriched in the cerebrovascular ECM network. This provides unique mechanistic insight into cerebrovascular disease and potential drug targets. Overall, we provide a powerful resource to study the functions of brain ECM and highlight a specific role for brain vascular ECM in cerebral vascular disease.

Original publication

DOI

10.1177/0271678x211004307

Type

Journal article

Journal

Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

Publication Date

09/2021

Volume

41

Pages

2423 - 2438

Addresses

Translational Molecular Neuroscience Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.